Recipe – Auction Cake

This is the excerpt for a featured content post.

Advertisements

I wanted to share this seemingly obscure recipe as it was shared with me and I am so glad it was!

My mom has one of those fundraiser cookbooks, the ones that community organizations do as fundraisers, from her short time spent living in Louisville, KY before I was born. Among other things, this cookbook holds the very best recipe for the very best fresh apple cake in the world. Because of this cake and it’s prominence in our lives, I grew up thinking those cookbook ladies were second only to Betty Crocker. You know, didn’t your mom have the Queen’s Daughters’ Recipes c. 1960 cookbook, too?

While this post is not about fresh apple cake, it is about a cake like the Queen’s Daughters’ Fresh Apple Cake in that it hails from a completely not-famous chef’s kitchen, yet is completely worth being written down and kept forever. So here you go, and the story to go with it, from my friend, Pat.

AUCTION CAKE 

from Pat Mofjeld

For cake: 

1 C. sugar

1/2 C. butter

2 eggs

2 C. flour

1 C. sour milk

1 tsp. soda

1/4 C. ground orange rind

1 C. raisins, ground

1/2 C. nuts

For glaze:

Juice of 1 orange

1/2 C. sugar

Cream sugar and butter.  Add eggs and mix well.  Add flour, soda, and sour milk, mix well.  Add nuts, raisins, and orange rind–mix well.  Bake in Bundt pan or greased and floured 9 x 13″ pan at 350 degrees for about 45  minutes.  (35 minutes for 9 x 13 pan).  When cake is done, boil juice from one orange and 1/2 C. sugar and baste the cake slowly with pastry brush until all glaze is absorbed.   

To this recipe, I responded in email, “Ground raisins?” and Pat responded, “Yes, you grind them.  I use my Little Oster food processor for the orange and raisins.” Huh. Well, OK. 

Want to know what happens when you blitz a cup of raisins (I used golden) with the zest of an orange until it is pasty? A little thing called nectar-of-the-gods. No lie. It’s like what all the Skittles tossed in your mouth at once should taste like except for the artificial flavoring part. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s